Should the healthcare industry require emotional intelligence as a minimum requirement when hiring a new nurse?

Posted by: goodGURL

Ask yourself about your recent encounter/experience with a healthcare provider...Did you feel listened to; better yet satisfied with the type of treatment you were provided because you were understood by your healthcare provider?

Poll closed on 7/23/2015 at 9:00AM.
  • Yes, because emotional intelligence is compassionate and it provides comfort to the patient that he/she is being heard and understood with no judgment

  • No, because as a healthcare provider, one needs not be emotional or personal when treating patient.

100% 4 votes
0% No votes
  • It can be traumatizing to some patients otherwise if emotional intelligence is absent.

    Posted by: Najs
  • No votes.
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PetersSmith says2015-06-03T23:42:32.3470090-05:00
If you're a surgeon it might be a problem because you'd let your emotions get in the way of your job.
goodGURL says2015-06-13T18:58:17.2527351-05:00
Thank you Najs for your comment. I agree that it can be a traumatizing experience due to the uncertainty when patients visit their healthcare provider. And it is more when one comes across a clinician who does not seem to care about how one is feeling or thinking when providing care. I believe that a little "TLC", in layman's terms, - tender, loving, care, can't hurt anybody. I am a proponent of an all around patient-centered care + patient experience = positive patient outcome.
goodGURL says2015-06-17T20:34:54.8563092-05:00
@PetersSmith, my poll is asking about an actual interaction between a patient and a clinician as well as overall live patient experience. A surgery is a different interaction because the patient is on the table. Surgeons are different and they are excluded from this poll. Sorry for not clarifying that in my opening statement of this poll.

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